‘Austerity is a mistake’: Jeremy Corbyn calls for a ‘no-cuts’ programme

The leader of the Labour Party has called for a “no-cut” programme that would be paid for by “cutting taxes for everyone”.

Jeremy Corbyn is the latest senior figure in the UK’s ruling elite to call for a no-cuts programme, after the Labour party lost control of the House of Commons and the UK went into a general election due to a hung parliament.

In his latest interview with BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Mr Labour said he would propose a no debt reduction (NDR) programme, which he described as “a fairer tax”.””

This should be about a no cuts programme.”

In his latest interview with BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Mr Labour said he would propose a no debt reduction (NDR) programme, which he described as “a fairer tax”.

“I think it’s a very good idea,” he said.

He also called for the UK to leave the European Union, saying: “It is time for us to put a break on the negotiations and leave the EU”.”

What we should have to be talking to people about is how we are going to cut the deficit, which is a very serious issue.”

He also called for the UK to leave the European Union, saying: “It is time for us to put a break on the negotiations and leave the EU”.

The comments come as a leaked draft document published by the BBC reveals that the Conservative Party will seek to extend the Conservative government’s mandate by six years.

The document, seen by the Sunday Telegraph, also says the Conservative leadership contest is “the most important in modern British political history” and that the Conservatives would not be able to win an overall majority in the House if it does not include a “majority of MPs” with a majority of the Commons.

“This is the most important election of the Conservative era,” Mr Corbyn added.

“It will determine the Conservative Government’s position on Brexit, the future of Trident and much more.”

Mr Corbyn was speaking ahead of a conference on Monday where he will say whether the Conservatives can win a majority.

The Labour leader also said he believed the government was “on the brink of disaster” with the country “on a knife edge” with Brexit negotiations, but added he would be prepared to stand aside to let the UK leave the bloc.

“I am going to do everything in my power to bring about that moment of clarity, but it’s going to be an incredibly difficult, complicated process,” he told the Today programme.

“But I do believe that this is the moment for us in the Labour leadership race to get out and get to work.”

Mr McDonnell, the shadow chancellor, told Today that the UK was “in an extraordinary situation” and he had “no idea” if the UK would remain in the EU.

“The whole of our economy is dependent on it,” he added.

Mr McDonnell told Today he was “totally committed” to the UK leaving the EU but had no “specific plan” for when he would take up his role in Parliament.

“We will make a decision together in a few weeks.

We will be able look at the process and see what our priorities are,” he admitted.

The government will seek a majority in Parliament, with a 50 per cent majority needed to pass the Brexit deal.

The Conservative party is also under pressure from its right-wing backbenchers to abandon the plans for a second referendum, following a series of high-profile resignations.

On Monday, Labour announced that the party would vote against the second referendum on the Brexit terms.

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